Coroner’s “Grin”

Coroner’s Grin has a unique quality that can only be found in the type exceeds the norm. Tracks from the album inch along under a musically clear, crisp air of creativeness that is found within dimensions of smooth instrumentation. The majority of songs’ content is told with a familiar harsh vocal style, but some songs remain more memorable than others.

 

 

Album artwork for Grin by Coroner. Image courtesy: amazon.com

 

 


“Serpent Moves” seems to have a motive to explore other fields of sound, yet confines itself with a familiar rhythm. It offers an intensity that announces itself through activity. Perhaps the best prepared track to adhere to the progressive structure would be “Paralyzed, Mesmerized”. Like many other tunes on the album, it has the territory to subject listeners to its focus. The result allows it to extend past the average time for songs at an astonishing eight minutes and eight seconds. Toward the end of the song, it encounters a seemingly odd rhythm that unmasks the distorted, dreamy appeal of the song title.

The overall quality of the album may drift into one’s familiarity of the sounds that molded and lifted early 90s alternative rock into commercial successes. However, that should not serve as an alarm to make the avid heavy metal listener flee from embracing Grin.

It may appear perplexing that in the late 80s, Coroner’s works gobbled the attitude of technical thrash as well as the lyrical content that frequents the well known songs of the sub-genre’s younger generation. Even though it leans toward a multifaceted framework, the message gets channeled with a vocal tribute that is known to their previous albums. A possible conflict arising from the album may be its inability to give fans of Coroner an echo of their other albums, since it strays from their template. However, the atmosphere of thrash that has a technical nature can serve as an excuse for it be dormant from other explorations. A great bet says that it will follow a modern listener’s journey within the zone of more versatile Opeth,  possibly a nostalgic listen from late Celtic Frost, or even the exploratory-nature of some early technical death metal.

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